The Marikina (your) Fault Line

As the world (by world I mean the Philippines) whips into a frenzy about the recent events concerning the island of Japan people have been barraging the news about earthquake and tsunami trivia. Most notable of which is the Marikina Fault Line.

It supposedly traverses through many parts of Metro Manila particularly Marikina, Quezon City, Pasig and Taguig. The fault line was featured last year when a 7.0 magnitude earthquake devastated Haiti.

It seems every time the Marikina Fault Line hits the news people are always taken aback and surprised that there is a potential place for tectonic activity in the heart of the Metro as if it was something new, even though it’s been there for more than two millenia.

But blissful ignorance and seasonal enlightenment are the least of our worries. What we should worry about are those two combined with fatalist mentalities.

In a recent report by GMA7 or ABS-CBN (I can’t remember which, even though they’re sworn enemies the differences are so small and few they might as well be twins) predictably featured the Marikina Fault Line and the preparedness of the citizens in the event of seismic activity.

One interview really got on my nerves. When asked by the reporter if she was ready if and when an earthquake occurred she just laughed and said she would hide under the table. When asked what else she just laughed some more and said she’s hide under the table.

Yes you have to take cover under something but earthquakes are complex tantrums of nature that can’t be predicted even with all the technology at the disposal of mankind. It’s more than a rumble and a shake and you need to do a hell of a lot more than hide under things. You can be caught in a plethora of different scenarios that don’t provide things to hide under, and if you don’t know what to do you might as well just stab yourself to get it over with.

What if you’re outside, or in a car, or got trapped under debris? What should you do? Well, if you’re the girl in the report, just stab yourself and get it over with.

Not to mention what to do when it’s all over (aftershocks included).

What if injuries happen?
Do you stay put or leave?
Where do you go?

And what really burns me is when she said “Eh kung oras ko na, oras ko na. Wala tayong magagawa, kalikasan yun eh

Gunggong! Anong walang magagawa?! Kaya nga may saftey measure kasi may magagwa, tanga! Ayaw mo lang alamin. At ano ‘tong kung oras ko na, oras ko na?! Gago! Walang oras oras, excuse lang yan kasi di mo alam dapat mong gawin para mabuhay ka!

It’s this fatalist attitude so prevalent in our culture that has propagated sloth in pursuing progress. No one decides your time but yourself. You don’t leave it up to anything or anyone else.

The entire concept of a set time for death is not only stupid it’s irresponsible. What if you have dependents like children or infirmed that still believe in living or haven’t experienced life the way they want to? Are you going to leave them behind because you’re too lazy to be bothered with keeping yourself alive?!

The instinct and drive to survive is the most important driving force that has propelled all known species to (duh) survive until this very second; and this fatalism is completely reversing that.

If you believe in set times you might as well stand in front of a train right now coz really, you’re mentally suicidal anyway.

When people ask where to place fault on your eventual death (natural disaster or otherwise) they won’t say Marikina, they’ll say you.

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6 Tugon to “The Marikina (your) Fault Line”

  1. It was a report of GMA-7.

  2. too bad you live near the Marikina fault line. 🙂

    “might as well just stab yourself to get it over with.”

  3. You have great skill in writing articles….

    Thanks for the interesting things you have unveiled in your article.I will be sure to bookmark it and come back to read more of your useful information. I will certainly return….

  4. We have a map detail of the Marikina Fault Line up to street level. You may now know whether you live or work near the fault.

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